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Making Self-Care a Habit

Making Self-Care a Habit

For many of us self-care is synonymous with things like trips to the spa or once a year vacation and is permissioned perhaps as only an intermittent break from the stress of our everyday lives. But I believe that a habit of true self-care is essential to how we stay present in our lives, how we resource ourselves to make better decisions and create the sense of agency necessary to make changes.  It is also the well from which we draw our energy to give and care for others. But how many of us are running on empty all the time between work and home life?  How often is taking care of yourself the thing that comes last or the first thing to go when your schedule goes sideways?

Here’s What You Need to Know About the New Law on Relocation

Here’s What You Need to Know About the New Law on Relocation

If you have a potential relocation issue in your divorce or custody case, it is important that you educate yourself as to how this change in the law impacts you. 

New Domestic Violence Case Finds that Inherently Violent Nature of Some Acts of Domestic Violence Are Self-Evident of Need For Final Restraining Order.

The Appellate Division opinion of A.M.C. v. P.B, released for publication on October 21, 2016 finds that a Trial Court misapplied the two-prong test for determining whether the issuance of Final Restraining Order is necessary (set forth in the landmark domestic violence case Silver v. Silver which requires in its second prong that the Court find that a domestic violence restraining order is necessary to protect a victim from future abuse). The Trial Court had found that the defendant had perpetrated acts of domestic violence, in this case, the assault of the victim on two separate occasions in a three- week period, including a physical assault that took place to prevent the victim from leaving the marital residence. But then determined that a Final Restraining Order was not necessary because it was not necessary to protect the victim from further acts of domestic violence because they believed that the parties’ relationship had ended when the victim left the marital residence because there were no children of the relationship and the fact that the defendant had no violated the TRO (which had not been served upon him) after the victim left the marital residence.